Social-Emotional Learning

Panorama Selected in CASEL’s Social-Emotional Assessment Design Challenge

Today the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), the leading organization promoting social-emotional learning for children in preschool through high school, selected Panorama Education as a winner in its annual Social-Emotional Learning Assessment Design Challenge.

Launched this year, the award aims to “stimulate the development and adoption of social-emotional assessments that support effective instruction and positive student development.” A panel of judges from school districts, education nonprofits, and research institutions—including those from Stanford University, the CORE Districts, Washoe County School District, Oakland Unified School District, and the University of Michigan—selected the winning social-emotional learning assessment designs.

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Explore Second Step Resources on Playbook

Each year, nearly 20,000 elementary and middle schools use the Second Step program to help students understand and manage their emotions and social relationships. With Second Step, students develop social-emotional skills through weekly lessons that involve stories, games, writing and drawing, and other interactive activities.

Now, teachers can explore classroom activities and strategies from Second Step on Playbook, Panorama’s professional learning community for teachers. The classroom activities written by Second Step available on Playbook align with Panorama’s measures of social-emotional learning, including social awareness, emotion regulation, self-efficacy, and grit.

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Reinforcing Multi-Tiered System of Supports with Panorama Education

District and school leaders across the country are developing and implementing Multi-Tiered Systems of Supports (MTSS) and using Panorama for Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) to identify student needs and measure progress. Social-emotional learning is the process through which students develop the mindsets, skills, and attitudes that enable them to succeed in school and in life. Panorama for SEL helps districts measure students’ social-emotional development using student perception surveys and/or teacher perception of student surveys.

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Supporting Social-Emotional Learning Growth for Every Student

Panorama’s New Student Social-Emotional Learning Reports Give Students Tools to Chart Their Own Growth

Last year, Panorama introduced Panorama for Social-Emotional Learning, an online platform for social-emotional learning student surveys and data analytics. Since then, thousands of schools have used Panorama to measure and improve their students’ social-emotional learning at the school and district level. Now, Panorama is launching student social-emotional learning reports, providing easy-to-read, actionable information about individual students’ social-emotional learning. Students and their teachers and families are using student social-emotional learning reports to identify and communicate about students’ individual strengths and opportunities for social-emotional growth.

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The Social-Emotional Skill of Perspective Taking

Social-emotional learning shows real staying power in our schools and classrooms, and social-emotional skills can be taught. One core social-emotional skill is social perspective taking, the capacity to make sense of others’ thoughts and feelings. These are the straightforward messages of Dr. Hunter Gehlbach’s article, “Learning to Walk in Another’s Shoes,” recently published in Phi Delta Kappan and profiled in the Marshall MemoIn the article, Professor Gehlbach (University of California, Santa Barbara and Director of Research at Panorama Education) outlines three actionable priorities for teaching students the social-emotional skill of social perspective taking.

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social-emotional learning data

How to Share Social-Emotional Learning Data with Students

In our work with schools and districts, Panorama supports educators in using social-emotional learning (SEL) surveys to better understand the strengths and needs of their students. Many districts use social-emotional learning data for district- and school-wide data inquiry and continuous improvement processes and to set targeted goals around social-emotional learning growth.

Increasingly, we’re finding that school leaders and teachers are interested in sharing this SEL data directly with students. Discussing SEL data with students promotes a deeper understanding of what is measured, what these SEL skills mean, and what students can do to improve. Drawing from our work with school districts nationwide, we’ve created a brief guide for sharing SEL data with students.

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